Foot Problems Caused by Staying at Home

woman's feet

At Superior Foot & Ankle Care we’ve seen an increase in foot pain among our Los Angeles County patients in recent months. For many, this is the result of the shutdown due to the pandemic. Many people have had their normal fitness routine interrupted. In addition, a simple at-home habit has had a surprising consequence. Going barefoot or wearing slippers or flip-flops around the house may be normal after work—but what about when you don’t leave the house to go to work? The increased amount of time in this type of footwear leads to several common conditions including:

Re-Entering an Active Lifestyle

As you begin to get back to your normal routine there are some steps you can take to help ease the transition and reduce foot discomfort.

  • Wear good quality, supportive shoes, even when home. The trouble with going barefoot is that the arch of the foot is not supported. As your arch flattens, it puts strain on the plantar fascia (the long band of tissue that stretches across the bottom of your foot). This can cause both arch and heel pain. A cushioned insole is also helpful in preventing podiatric pain.
  • Change positions frequently. Working from home means you’re not even walking to the car or going out at lunch. Be sure to get up at least once an hour if you’re sitting at a desk or try standing to work if you can find a counter that is the correct height. Stretch and rotate your feet and wiggle your toes throughout the day to stay flexible and keep up good circulation.
  • Gradually increase activity. While it may be tempting to jump into an exercise program at full speed, it’s better to start slowly. You’re more prone to injuries if you try to push your body too far too fast after a period of being inactive. Walking is a great way to re-enter a more active lifestyle. Try fitting in a walk during lunch or at the end of the workday.

If you’re experiencing foot pain that you can’t explain or you start to have uncomfortable symptoms in your feet or ankles as you become more active, contact our Long Beach office at (562) 420-9800 and schedule an appointment with our podiatrists, Dr. Victoria M. Foley and Dr. Constance Ornelas.